scienceyoucanlove:

GREAT NEWS! Researchers have developed a new reconstructive procedure that uses lab-grown cartilage instead of borrowed cartilage from ribs or ears to reconstruct noses, and have performed the first reconstructive nasal surgery using engineered tissue. The method is less invasive and can also be used to engineer cartilage for eyelids or ear reconstruction procedures.Read more: http://bit.ly/P4s8A8 via Smithsonian MagazineImage: Department of Biomedicine at the University of Basel
text source

scienceyoucanlove:

GREAT NEWS! Researchers have developed a new reconstructive procedure that uses lab-grown cartilage instead of borrowed cartilage from ribs or ears to reconstruct noses, and have performed the first reconstructive nasal surgery using engineered tissue. The method is less invasive and can also be used to engineer cartilage for eyelids or ear reconstruction procedures.

Read more: http://bit.ly/P4s8A8 via Smithsonian Magazine

Image: Department of Biomedicine at the University of Basel

text source

(via scientificthought)

kenobi-wan-obi:

"Race doesn’t matter!" , "Isn’t science just science?! why bring race into it!!", "It is not about the colour of skin!" meanwhile in the real world:

Is There a Bias Against Black Scientists? Funding Sparse for Minority Researchers

Black researchers and other minorities face nearly insurmountable barriers against career success, according to new research.

A February 2014 article in the Journal of Career Development details the work experiences of minority researchers in the social sciences.

Rebecca R. Kameny of the 3-C Institute for Social Development in North Carolina, directed the study, which collected data from people of color who attended a workshop on the topic of career barriers.

An astounding 72 percent of participants reported encountering workplace barriers due to their race or ethnicity.

Racism: A Sad History

Bias against minority researchers is not a new subject. In 2011, Donna K. Ginthner and her associates published a study about the NIH and grants to minority researchers. (The NIH, or National Institute of Health, is a government agency that serves as one of the prime supporters of scientific research.)

The Ginther study examined the rates at which grants were given to 83,000 researchers. Unfortunately, they found that the funding agency is biased against African Americans who submitted grant applications. According to the study, blacks are 13% less likely than equally-qualified white candidates to receive funding that is initiated by an NIH investigator.

The study’s writers explained that the researchers’ race is not always written on the application, but the applications’ reviewers could infer race from the applicants’ names and places of study. Without receiving federal funding, a researcher is less likely to receive a teaching position, less likely to be given tenure, and has more difficulty procuring funding to produce research and publish in scholarly journals. Ultimately, the repercussions of grant refusal are reflected in the face of academia.

When the study was published, the director of the NIH noted that the data is troubling and the situation is unacceptable. The NIH launched a $500 million, 10-year program to support young minorities in science. It is also considering changing its review process to review grant proposals anonymously to prevent this issue in the future.

Bias Against Blacks: Misinterpreted Data?

A 2013 study published in the Journal of Informetrics, however, contradicts the premise of bias against black researchers. The study, led by Jiansheng Yang of Virginia Tech, paints a different picture, concluding that the NIH review process contains no inherent racial bias.

Yang and his associates reviewed the work of 40 black faculty members and 80 white faculty members at U.S. medical schools. They assessed the scientists’ productivity, based on the number of publications they wrote, their role on each paper, and the prominence of the journals in which they published. Overall, Wang’s team found that the black faculty members were less productive than their white colleagues.

The researchers then reviewed the work of 11 of those black researchers and 11 of those white researchers who had received NIH funding. When they compared blacks and whites who had the same level of productivity, they found that people of both races received the same level of NIH funding. Wang concluded that funding is determined by level of success, and not by race.

Not Apples to Apples

Ginther, who found ample evidence of the NIH’s racial bias, argued in Science that Wang did not study the same aspects of the process that she did, so he cannot refute her claim. She noted that Wang’s study examined only a small number of researchers, and also looked only at how much funding they received, instead of whether they had a chance of receiving funding in the first place.

Ginther also noted that the black scientists’ lower level of productivity pointed to their difficulty in receiving positive mentoring, which is a further function of bias.

Discrimination is Not Dead

It seems that a majority of African Americans would agree with Ginther’s point about bias. A 2013 Pew Research study about discrimination in America found that a full 88% of blacks reported that there is discrimination against blacks. 46 % believe that there is a lot of discrimination, and the rest report feeling some discrimination.

Interestingly, white Americans agree that blacks are discriminated against, but to a lesser degree. Only 16% of whites feel that there is a lot of discrimination, but 41% sense some discrimination.

Regardless of percentages and perceptions, race-based barriers to success have no place in academia or the workplace.

(via scientificthought)

catsteaks:

A monument in Novosibirsk, Russia, dedicated to all the lab rats who were sacrificed for DNA research.

catsteaks:

A monument in Novosibirsk, Russia, dedicated to all the lab rats who were sacrificed for DNA research.

(via alscientist)

astrodidact:

This is unnerving. Holy shit…
CDC warns that gonorrhea on verge of being untreatable 
via All Science, All the Time/fb
The CDC has issued a report detailing its findings in attempting to trace the increasing difficulty in treating gonorrhea, a sexually transmitted disease (STD) that can cause severe discomfort, serious medical problems (such as sterility) for both genders and in very rare cases, death.
Gonorrhea is a bacterial disease that has been around for thousands of years, if not longer, plaguing human populations. In more recent times, it’s had to evolve to survive as humans learned to treat it using penicillin and other antibacterial agents. Over the past thirty years in particular, gonorrhea has evolved to the point that there are very few treatments left (ceftriaxone along with either azithromycin or doxycycline) and now, it looks like its poised to get the best of those as well, which will mean those who contract the disease in the very near future will find that doctors have no way to cure them.

To learn more about the evolutionary history of the disease, the CDC looked at data regarding 17 major cities in the United States between the years 1991 and 2006. They found that gonorrhea was more common in cities with low resistance, but ominously, they also found that rates of gonorrhea were rising faster in cities with high resistance. They note that currently, there are approximately 820,000 new cases of gonorrhea each year in this country. The real problem is that there are now so few antibiotics that are able to treat the disease, and while no strains of the bacteria that are resistant to them have been found so far in the United States, the same cannot be said for other countries.
The overriding conclusion of the researchers is that the world is now sitting on the precipice of losing the ability to fight a major bacterial infection. Worse perhaps, is that it may mark the first of many others to come. Gonorrhea infections typically only last for a few weeks or months, in most cases the immune system eventually wins over (after the disease has caused sometimes irreparable damage). The same cannot be said for some other bacterial infections that may also soon become untreatable. For that reason, scientists around the world continue to scramble to find alternatives.
In the meantime, the CDC is predicting that the spread of treatment-resistant gonorrhea is imminent, and because of that the country (and the rest of the world) will soon begin to experience widespread outbreaks.
Source: http://m.medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-cdc-gonorrhea-verge-untreatable.html

astrodidact:

This is unnerving. Holy shit…

CDC warns that gonorrhea on verge of being untreatable

via All Science, All the Time/fb

The CDC has issued a report detailing its findings in attempting to trace the increasing difficulty in treating gonorrhea, a sexually transmitted disease (STD) that can cause severe discomfort, serious medical problems (such as sterility) for both genders and in very rare cases, death.

Gonorrhea is a bacterial disease that has been around for thousands of years, if not longer, plaguing human populations. In more recent times, it’s had to evolve to survive as humans learned to treat it using penicillin and other antibacterial agents. Over the past thirty years in particular, gonorrhea has evolved to the point that there are very few treatments left (ceftriaxone along with either azithromycin or doxycycline) and now, it looks like its poised to get the best of those as well, which will mean those who contract the disease in the very near future will find that doctors have no way to cure them.

To learn more about the evolutionary history of the disease, the CDC looked at data regarding 17 major cities in the United States between the years 1991 and 2006. They found that gonorrhea was more common in cities with low resistance, but ominously, they also found that rates of gonorrhea were rising faster in cities with high resistance. They note that currently, there are approximately 820,000 new cases of gonorrhea each year in this country. The real problem is that there are now so few antibiotics that are able to treat the disease, and while no strains of the bacteria that are resistant to them have been found so far in the United States, the same cannot be said for other countries.

The overriding conclusion of the researchers is that the world is now sitting on the precipice of losing the ability to fight a major bacterial infection. Worse perhaps, is that it may mark the first of many others to come. Gonorrhea infections typically only last for a few weeks or months, in most cases the immune system eventually wins over (after the disease has caused sometimes irreparable damage). The same cannot be said for some other bacterial infections that may also soon become untreatable. For that reason, scientists around the world continue to scramble to find alternatives.

In the meantime, the CDC is predicting that the spread of treatment-resistant gonorrhea is imminent, and because of that the country (and the rest of the world) will soon begin to experience widespread outbreaks.

Source: http://m.medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-cdc-gonorrhea-verge-untreatable.html

(via scientificthought)

sorryimhuman:

justdorothynodandridge:

Kayden’s first time experiencing rain (x)

I think this the most magical thing ever.

(Source: tatymaslany, via secondhandtype40tardis)

"Thank God you see me the way you do.
Strange as you are to me."
infinity-imagined:

A helical TALE protein molecule wrapped around a double helix of DNA.  TALEs stands for “Transcription Activator-Like Effectors”, they are produced by Xanthomonas bacteria when entering a plant cell.  They manipulate the host cell by switching on certain genes that make the plant cell more susceptible to infection.  TALE subunits bind to the nucleotides of DNA in a 1:1 ratio, and each subunit has a pair of amino acids that is specific to a single DNA base.  This enables the TALEs to recognize specific DNA sequences and activate them.
Animation rendered from PDB file 3UGM with qutemol.

infinity-imagined:

A helical TALE protein molecule wrapped around a double helix of DNA.  TALEs stands for “Transcription Activator-Like Effectors”, they are produced by Xanthomonas bacteria when entering a plant cell.  They manipulate the host cell by switching on certain genes that make the plant cell more susceptible to infection.  TALE subunits bind to the nucleotides of DNA in a 1:1 ratio, and each subunit has a pair of amino acids that is specific to a single DNA base.  This enables the TALEs to recognize specific DNA sequences and activate them.

Animation rendered from PDB file 3UGM with qutemol.

(Source: nature.com, via scientificthought)

mucholderthen:

UNTREATABLE
Today’s Drug-Resistant Health Threats
[via Centers for Disease Control and Prevention]
[Graphics gallery, available for downloading]

Every year, more than two million people in the United States get infections that are resistant to antibiotics and at least 23,000 people die as a result, according to a new report issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Download / View the report as a PDF …

The report, Antibiotic Resistance Threats in the United States, 2013, presents a first-ever snapshot of the burden and threats posed by the antibiotic-resistant germs that have the most impact on human health. This report is also the first time that CDC has ranked these threats into categories of urgent, serious, and concerning.

In addition to the illness and deaths caused by resistant bacteria, the report found that C. difficile, a serious diarrheal infection usually associated with antibiotic use, causes at least 250,000 hospitalizations and 14,000 deaths every year.

  • The loss of effective antibiotic treatments will not only cripple the ability to fight routine infectious diseases
  • but will also undermine treatment of infectious complications in patients with other diseases.
  • Many advances in medical treatment, such as joint replacements, organ transplants, and cancer therapies, are dependent on the ability to fight infections with antibiotics. If the ability to effectively treat those infections is lost, the ability to safely offer people many of the life-saving and life-improving modern medical advances will be lost with it.

The use of antibiotics is the single most important factor leading to antibiotic resistance around the world. Antibiotics are among the most commonly prescribed drugs used in human medicine. However, up to half of antibiotic use in humans and much of antibiotic use in animals is unnecessary or inappropriate.

(via CDC Online Newsroom)

(via alscientist)

actualfuchsiablood:

doll-freaking-house:

tibsyxd:

potatoesandkew:

thesciencellama:

Elements
By KcD Studios - on tumblr

CRYING AT THE BEAUTY.

This is so….oh my god this is just so awesome!

So….These are designed to be shippable, right?

YES I WILL SHIP ELEMENTS

(Source: the-science-llama, via scientificthought)

post-mitotic:

Kupffer cell, specialized resident macrophage of the liver, sneaking about the lining of hepatic sinusoids
in light micrographs, these cells are difficult to distinguish unless special techniques are used, such as carbon injection (carbon is readily phagocytosed by the Kupffer cells which can then be imaged)
colored SEM
credit: Thomas Deerinck

post-mitotic:

Kupffer cell, specialized resident macrophage of the liver, sneaking about the lining of hepatic sinusoids

in light micrographs, these cells are difficult to distinguish unless special techniques are used, such as carbon injection (carbon is readily phagocytosed by the Kupffer cells which can then be imaged)

colored SEM

credit: Thomas Deerinck

(via scientificthought)