compoundchem:

A look at the chemistry behind the colours of various gemstones; read more & see a larger version of the graphic here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-lj

compoundchem:

A look at the chemistry behind the colours of various gemstones; read more & see a larger version of the graphic here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-lj

(via vetstudent-microbiologymaniac)

skunkbear:

As Virginia Hughes noted in a recent piece for National Geographic’s Phenomena blog, the most common depiction of a synapse (that communicating junction between two neurons) is pretty simple:

Signal molecules leave one neuron from that bulby thing, float across a gap, and are picked up by receptors on the other neuron. In this way, information is transmitted from cell to cell … and thinking is possible.

But thanks to a bunch of German scientists - we now have a much more complete and accurate picture. They’ve created the first scientifically accurate 3D model of a synaptic bouton (that bulby bit) complete with every protein and cytoskeletal element.

This effort has been made possible only by a collaboration of specialists in electron microscopy, super-resolution light microscopy (STED), mass spectrometry, and quantitative biochemistry.

says the press release. The model reveals a whole world of neuroscience waiting to be explored. Exciting stuff!

You can access the full video of their 3D model here.

Credit: Benjamin G. Wilhelm, Sunit Mandad, Sven Truckenbrodt, Katharina Kröhnert, Christina Schäfer, Burkhard Rammner, Seong Joo Koo, Gala A. Claßen, Michael Krauss, Volker Haucke, Henning Urlaub, Silvio O. Rizzoli

(via scientificthought)

lissymac37:

huffingtonpost:

People have offered many potential explanations for this discrepancy, but this ad highlights the importance of the social cues that push girls away from math and science in their earliest childhood years.

Watch the powerful Verizon advertisement to really understand what a little girl hears when you tell her she’s pretty.

This is so important. Girls pay attention. Boys, if you are a brother, father, cousin of a girl, pay attention.

(Source: youtube.com, via thedrawinglines)

freshphotons:

"Of the 118 elements that make up everything—from the compounds in a chemists arsenal to consumer products on the shelf—44 will face supply limitations in the coming years. These critical elements include rare earth elements, precious metals, and even life essentials like Phosphorus. Research into more abundant alternatives, more efficient uses, recycling and recovery will help mitigate risks and move industry us towards sustainable supply chains." Via.

freshphotons:

"Of the 118 elements that make up everything—from the compounds in a chemists arsenal to consumer products on the shelf—44 will face supply limitations in the coming years. These critical elements include rare earth elements, precious metals, and even life essentials like Phosphorus. Research into more abundant alternatives, more efficient uses, recycling and recovery will help mitigate risks and move industry us towards sustainable supply chains." Via.

(via scientificthought)

"Gentlemen, it is the microbes who will have the last word ."

— Louis Pasteur (translated from French)  (via blainerrrrr)

(via scientificthought)

amolecularmatter:

T cells are amazing white blood cells that play a crucial role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be divided into several categories - notably helper, cytotoxic, memory, regulatory, and natural killer (NK) - and their primary role within the immune system is to search out and destroy both invading pathogens and abnormal cells. Helper T cells also help to regulate the immune response.
The image above features a cytotoxic T cell, which destroy abnormal cells (most notably virally infected cells and tumour cells) and are also implicated in organ transplant rejection. Dendritic cells, pictured cyan blue in the photo, constitutively express high levels of both class I and class II MCH molecules - the type of receptor that cytotoxic T cells recognise - making them extraordinary potent activators capable of stimulating even “naive” T cells that have never encountered an antigen.

amolecularmatter:

T cells are amazing white blood cells that play a crucial role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be divided into several categories - notably helper, cytotoxic, memory, regulatory, and natural killer (NK) - and their primary role within the immune system is to search out and destroy both invading pathogens and abnormal cells. Helper T cells also help to regulate the immune response.

The image above features a cytotoxic T cell, which destroy abnormal cells (most notably virally infected cells and tumour cells) and are also implicated in organ transplant rejection. Dendritic cells, pictured cyan blue in the photo, constitutively express high levels of both class I and class II MCH molecules - the type of receptor that cytotoxic T cells recognise - making them extraordinary potent activators capable of stimulating even “naive” T cells that have never encountered an antigen.

(via alscientist)

compoundchem:

science-junkie:

Antibiotic Resistance Is Now Rife across the Globe

Dangerous antibiotic-resistant bacteria and other pathogens have now emerged in every part of the world and threaten to roll back a century of medical advances. That’s the message from the World Health Organization in its first global report on this growing problem, which draws on drug-resistance data in 114 countries.
 
“A post antibiotic-era—in which common infections and minor injuries can kill—far from being an apocalyptic fantasy, is instead a very real possibility for the 21st century,” wrote Keiji Fukuda, WHO’s assistant director general for Health Security, in an introduction to the report. The crisis is the fruit of several decades of overreliance on the drugs and careless prescribing practices as well as routine use of the medicines in the rearing of livestock, the report noted.
 
Antibiotic resistance is putting patients in peril in both developing and developed countries, as bacteria responsible for an array of dangerous infections evolve resistance to the drugs that once vanquished them.
 
Gonorrhea, once well treated by antibiotics, is once again a major public health threat due to the emergence of new, resistant strains. Drugs that were once a last resort treatment for the sexually transmitted disease—which can lead to infertility, blindness and increased odds of HIV transmission if left untreated—are now the first-line treatment and are sometimes ineffective among patients in countries such as the U.K., Canada, Australia, France, Japan, Norway, South Africa, Slovenia and Sweden.
 
Drugs to treat Klebsiella pneumoniae—a common intestinal bacteria that can cause life-threatening infections in intensive care unit patients and newborns—no longer work in more than half of patients in some countries. And fluoroquinolones, drugs used to treat urinary tract infections, are also ineffective in more than half of sufferers in many parts of the world. Efforts to limit the spread of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, malaria and HIV are also all under threat due to increasing bacterial resistance.
 
Although the development of resistance is to be expected over time, overuse of the drugs has accelerated the process by supplying additional selective pressure, noted the report, which was authored by an extensive team of researchers with WHO. And there are few drugs to replace the ones that are now ineffective: The last entirely new class of antibacterial drugs was discovered 27 years ago, according to the report.

Read more via scientificamerican.com

Infographic by who.int

Important stuff, and accompanied by a nicely done graphic.

Also, a graphic on the different major types of antibiotics would definitely be an interesting one - one for my to-do list!

(via scientificthought)

freshphotons:

A 3D model of synaptic architecture. ”We used an integrative approach, combining quantitative immunoblotting and mass spectrometry to determine protein numbers; electron microscopy to measure organelle numbers, sizes, and positions; and super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to localize the proteins. Using these data, we generated a three-dimensional model of an “average” synapse, displaying 300,000 proteins in atomic detail.” Via.

(via scientificthought)

mucholderthen:

INFOGRAPHIC: Middle East Respiratory Syndrome
From 2013, but still in use by ABC News [the US “ABC”]

A new virus similar to SARS is spreading through the Middle East and parts of Europe. The virus, dubbed MERS-CoV for Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, has killed more than half of its victims as experts scramble to identify the source. 

(MERS Coronavirus Infographic /// ABC News)

(via scientificthought)

bklynmed:

Ever wonder what the cardiac cycle looks like?

bklynmed:

Ever wonder what the cardiac cycle looks like?

(Source: gifdistrict, via vetstudent-microbiologymaniac)